Could it be dyslexia?

Could it be dyslexia?

John Boggan’s struggle with dyslexia began in kindergarden.” As I went through grade-school I had issues with math and transposing numbers and writing was tough.When I would read, I would skip around and not follow the sentences.” Said Bogan. He was eventually diagnosed with the learning disability known as dyslexia that is neurological in origin.

John Boggan’s struggle with dyslexia began in kindergarden.” As I went through grade-school I had issues with math and transposing numbers and writing was tough.When I would read, I would skip around and not follow the sentences.” Said Bogan.

He was eventually diagnosed with the learning disability known as dyslexia that is neurological in origin. It is also known as a reading, writing and spelling disorder which affects people in different degrees.

“Dyslexia does not have anything to do with how smart you are. It has to do with how your brain can change the symbols back into language and whether or not you can comprehend what you just read.” Explained general tutor Liz Plake. Who has been tutoring children with dyslexia for over 20 years.

According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, One in five students in the United States has a language based disability and 70 to 80 percent of people with poor reading skills are more likely dyslexic. It affects males and females equally, although more boys are evaluated than girls.

It may be more difficult to notice dyslexia before a child enters school, but since reading is based on spoken language, if you notice the child has delayed speech, or does not recognize rhymes, or there is a family history of reading difficulties; you might consider testing. The sooner a child is evaluated; the sooner the condition can be remediated.

Licensed Dyslexia Therapist and the Director of Family Support and Adult Literacy Programs at the Neuhaus Education center Mary Yarus chose her own career when her daughter was diagnosed with dyslexia at the age of six. “My daughter would come home from school and have a meltdown.” Said Yarus. “In just six weeks I began to see a difference in her behavior once we got a specialist to help her. It takes about two years to go through a remediation program. I remember the turning point, when one day she was at food court and she looked up and read a sign and stared crying. She couldn’t believe could read and understand it! She loved to be read to, but when you showed her a book; she would be very frustrated. For her to spontaneously read a word that day; that was very special!

Yarus insists children love to learn and want to do well, but they are often wrongly labeled as being slow, dumb, or lazy! This has long term implications on their emotional well being.

Texas was the first state to create a dyslexia law in 1985. The goal was to identify dyslexia and to provide educational interventions once it was confirmed. “It is a good law, but there are no penalties if you don’t follow it!” Says Yarus.

In Houston public schools, parents can have their children evaluated for dyslexia for free guaranteed by the law. This law was created due to a growing need for early identification which becomes crucial to overcome the academic gap between dyslexic children and their classmates.

“I teach a course here at Neuhaus for parents each month to learn about the law and how to navigate the system.” Says Yarus.

Leslie Daniel, mildly dyslexic herself, and a mother of three dyslexic children; attended one of these courses at Neuhaus to help her children cope better with their condition. “These children absorb and store information in a different way! If given enough time, they can understand ideas from more than one perspective. This should give them a chance to enhance many disciplines with many innovative ideas.” She says. Her three children have higher than normal IQ’s despite their dyslexia. Let’s not forget Leonardo Da Vinci was dyslexic. He could not read or write, but he was given time to adjust.

“My advise to parents is, if your child is struggling; have them tested as soon as possible. Every child wants to learn. Trust your instincts, you know your child better than anyone. Another advise is to record what you observe your child do before you seek help. “ said Yarus.

For more information visit, http://tea.texas.gov/Curriculum_and_Instructional_Programs/Special_Student_Populations/Dyslexia/

By Patricia Gras

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