Get up and get going

Get up and get going

Elisabeth doesn’t recall ever being happy. As a child, she learned to live with her depression, but she relied on a good connection with God and spiritual strength to get her through life. She would watch her siblings being happy and outgoing and found it hard to understand. Through her teenage years, she was always

Elisabeth doesn’t recall ever being happy. As a child, she learned to live with her depression, but she relied on a good connection with God and spiritual strength to get her through life.

She would watch her siblings being happy and outgoing and found it hard to understand. Through her teenage years, she was always intimidated by anyone who was older than her. She shelled herself and kept only a close circle of friends from the same neighborhood. Going into high school things got tougher, she had to deal with a more diverse population at her new high school, which made the intimidation worse. The shy, Hispanic girl in her hated high school and felt like she could never fit in.

She got pregnant in the 11th grade and realized she had to eventually take care of a baby and move in with her boyfriend. During college, she started working and again felt lost at her new job. Being the youngest and the newest staff member enforced the sensation of inequality around her, and it troubled her.

It was this never-ending cycle of intimidation that she couldn’t get out of. “I would feel overwhelmed, walking around with a huge dark cloud above me all the time,” she says. The feeling of sadness would weigh her down and chain her. She could never break free.

Then life took her to another stage when she had her second baby. Her marriage wasn’t going well, so she decided to be a stay at home mom for a while, that got boring. She knew her children needed her, but she needed something else to do and decided to become a bus driver. Her work schedule was great, it permitted time with her children, but soon enough the feeling of overwhelming intimidation came upon her again. This time, though, it was with the high school children; their strong straight forward characters made it hard for her not to remember her high school years.

It wasn’t until she had an alarming panic attack that she decided to seek help.

“I asked around and was given Dr. Ahmed’s name in Baytown. I made an appointment and went to see him,” she says. “He prescribed a medication for me. In a few days I started noticing a big change. He asked me if I ever had anxiety and my reply was ‘no.’

“A few months later, things got worse again and I realized then that it was my anxiety I had had it for life, but never knew how bad it was. The medication helped cope with the depression and anxiety but I started hating being on meds. I wanted so badly to get off them.

“Dr. Ahmed advised me to try this new treatment if I am serious about being off meds. I like Dr. Ahmed, he always believes me when I tell him how I feel about my mental health. I trust him like a good friend. So I decided to give it a try. I started Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the brain, which, fortunately, my insurance covered.”

In her first week of treatment, Elisabeth felt lighter, positive and, most importantly, confident.

Finally, she was able to breathe easily and get rid of her fears.

“Deep inside, I knew things were getting better. I will never regret my decision to try this treatment,” she says. “It changed my life for good and made me who I always wanted to be, a confident person.”

Today, Elisabeth is a new person with mindset of goals and a bright future. She remembers that when she finally had the guts to end her marriage. She moved back to her parents’ house and told her dad she would stay for good. Her dad would wake her every morning and whisper in Spanish: “Get up and get going, daughter! Don’t give up, you have to throw punches; if not, your house will fall down.” A few words of wisdom Elisabeth will remember for life.

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